All posts filed under: Barcelona

Houses at the river

Girona – love at first sight

For a lot of people Girona is only a stop along the way to the Costa Brava or Barcelona, but Girona has more than a few things to offer and is definitely worth a visit. Already during my first visit I fell in love with this delightful, vivid and colourful town.


Bottom kissing

We start our tour at the bridge named Pont de San Feliu. From here you have the best view over the colourfully painted houses at the river Onyar. Orange, yellow, red…reflected in the small waves of the river, a lovely photo motif. We continue our walk, past the lion statue La LLeona at the Plaça de Sant Feliu and head towards old town. It is said that you can’t be a proper citizen of Girona without having kissed the bottom of the lion at least once. For visitors, the kiss promises a soon return to Girona. I forgo this custom, because l am certain of coming back anyway.

Lion statue

There is always a big crowd in front of the lion statue, waiting for their turn to kiss the lion’s backside.

Historic Baths dating back to 1194

Walking on the Carrer dels Calderers, we get to a small street called Pujada de Sant Feliu, which leads upwards. Here you can find a nice place for having a coffee or something to eat. Fortified, we pass by the Basílica Sant Feliu and go to the Arabic Baths. The entrance only costs 2 € (students only pay the half), so indeed a true bargain.

Ancient Baths

Inside the Arabic Baths, we are impressed by the unique architecture.

Witch hunting

Later, we follow the stairs up to the part behind the Cathedral of Girona. The view from there over the city is fascinating. We stroll along the small alleys up to the Jardins de la Francesa, a small garden, where you can find beautiful blue benches inviting you to have a seat and just relax. At the façade, there is an interesting detail to observe: a gargoyle shaped like a woman, called the witch. According to the legend, there was a woman throwing stones against the processions, until she herself got fossilized. In the garden you can also start the city wall-tour, which we postpone until later.

Having a break

Let’s have a short break in the shade.

Game of Thrones in Girona

Now it’s time to leave the garden and go to the place in front of the Cathedral. The Cathedral of Girona was built in various phases during the 14th, 15th and 17th century and has the widest Gothic nave in the world. From the Cathedral there are 90 stairs going downwards. This outside staircase is the biggest baroque staircase and even was the scene for the famous TV series Game of  Thrones. They even offer GOT tours around the city with stops at the various scenes.

Cathedral of Girona

Not only from outside, but also from inside the cathedral looks impressive.

Travelling through time

Downstairs, we walk on the Carrer de la Força (street of force) towards the old city and the Jewish quarter. Narrow, dark alleys are waiting for us and we now realize why Girona was serving as a medieval film set. We ourselves feel like back in time. The street of force was between 889 and 1492, so 600 (!!!) years, part of the Jewish quarter, also called Call.

Narrow alley in Girona

Walking through the dark and narrow alleys in the old town, we feel like back in the Middle Ages.

Time for shopping

Always straight ahead, passing tapas bars and restaurants, we arrive at the Plaça del Vi, turn right and go over the the bridge Pont de Pedra to the other side of the town. We turn right again into the Carrer de Santa Clara, following the street until we arrive at the next bridge. Of course, we can’t go past the shops without taking a look inside. In Girona there are so many small and adorable shops and boutiques, a paradise for all who love to shop.

Small supermarket

What we love most about Girona are the small and lovely shops.

Eiffel bridge

Passing trees with gorgeous pink blossoms, we walk over the Pont de les Peixeteries and return to the other city side. Girona has a large number of bridges, connecting both sides of the town, which are separated by the river Onyar. The Pont de les Peixeteries is a special highlight as it was constructed by Gustave Eiffel. The impressive metal structure leads us to the Rambla de la Llibertat. There is a lot going on here.

La Rambla de Girona

The Rambla de la Llibertad is an avenue with huge trees providing enough shade from the warm spring sun.

The most gorgeous bridge

Walking down the Rambla, we come to the Pont de Sant Agustí and to the Plaça de la Independència. Under the round arches, it’s finally time to enjoy a café con leche while watching the busy life at the square, one of my favourite things to do. After our short coffee break, we walk past the Plaça de la Independència and over the Pont d’en Gómez, in my opinion the most beautiful bridge of Girona.

Most beautiful bridge in Girona

At the Pont d’en Gómez you have some wonderful views to the colourful houses at the river Onyar.

Above the rooftops of Girona

Back at our starting point, we are now going to explore part of the old city wall. From there you have a stunning view over the rest of the popular sights, like for example the Basílica Sant Feliu, the Església de Sant Nicolau, the monastery of Sant Pere de Galligants and the small gardens and parks between.                                                                                                                                      There are so many different possibilities to discover this unique town. The best thing to do is to follow your hunch. Countless stairs promise secret surprises, for sure.

High above the rooftops of Girona

Climbing up the many stairs was totally worth it. What a view!

What you definitely have to try:

Tapas at Zanpanzar

Ice cream at Rocambolesc

Above Barcelona's roofs

Barcelona – two days in the Catalonian metropolis

Saturday morning at the train station in Barcelona. Here, Barbara is waiting for her boyfriend, who will come here directly from the airport. Their aim on this weekend: Exploring Barcelona and getting a first impression of the city between the mountains and the sea.

Arriving an adapting

Two days will never be enough for visiting all the sights, recommended restaurants and bars, museums and popular districts of the Catalonian capital, but nothing ventured, nothing gained. Therefore, the two set out for their little adventure, a little bit blind and disoriented, Barbara admits. The most important thing is the right direction: they focus on their hostel for leaving their luggage. Just following their nose, the couple goes by metro to the city centre, as their accommodation is located in front of the Universitat de Barcelona, close to Plaça Catalunya. However, they already change their plan during their metro journey, get off at the next station, look for a café and, in a more organized way, make a new weekend plan, while enjoying a café con leche and delicious croissants.

Blick über Barcelona

Where to start?

Goose, paella and the sea

Leaving their mystery tour-tactics behind, they both decide to go for a walk through the Barri Gòtic, the oldest district of the town. Their travel guide proposes a very interesting route with passing all the important sights. So perfect for tourists like them who don’t have much time. Starting at the Gothic cathedral “La Catedral de la Santa Creu i Santa Eulàlia“ with goose entertaining its visitors, Barbara and her boyfriend walk to the “Palau de la Generalitat“ where the Catalonian government has its seat, until the “Puente del Bisbe“, they visit all the famous Gothic buildings of Barcelona. At the same time, they get closer to the sea and make a break in the afternoon, at Spanish lunchtime, in the warm spring sun while having a tasty paella and a cold beer.

Palm trees in the cloister

Apart from the goose, there are also palm trees and other plants decorating the cathedral’s cloister.

Event location and leisure time spot

After the couple finally has left the luggage at their hostel, they make their way towards the local mountain, called Montjuïc, which has a height of 173 meters. The Montjuïc serves as a perfect event location, but also without anything planned, attracts as many tourists as locals. Whether the rests of the world exhibition in 1929, like the German pavilion constructed by Mies van der Rohe, the Font Màgica (magic fountain), the parks around the mountain or the impressive castle at the highest point of Montjuïc, there is a lot to see. From the castle, you have a beautiful view over the whole city and the Olympic site behind (In 1992, the Summer Olympics took place in Barcelona) with its huge TV mast provides enough space for a few quiet minutes, before they go back to the hustle and bustle.

Magic fountain

Montjuïc impresses with size and architecture.

Fascinating show and culinary diversity

Soon afterwards, Barbara and her boyfriend sit at the crowded stairs in front of the Font Màgica, waiting impatiently for the light show to begin. At 7 pm, water fountains will be shooting up into the air, accompanied by music and colourful lights. After the show, it’s time for dinner and they are spoilt for choice: the streets are endlessly filled with restaurants and tapas bars, especially in the trendy districts. The two look around next to Eixample and finally find a place for having something to eat.

Magic fountain during night

Both of them are impressed by all the different colours and formations of the lights.

Gaudí’s masterpieces

On Sunday, they planned to visit Barcelona’s highlights: the Sagrada Família and the Casa Milà, both constructed by the famous architect Antoni Gaudí. In a good mood and full of anticipation, they make their way towards the Sagrada. Arriving there, they get extremely disappointed. Of course, they didn’t reserve our tickets online in advance, which would have been a good idea. A big mistake regarding the huge queue of people already waiting since 9 am to get in. So, the two join the queue and are lucky: as one of the last people they still get tickets for the entrance at 1pm. Both of them appreciate the unexpected free time in the morning and visit the art nouveau Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, close to the Sagrada. Afterwards, they continue their Gaudí tour and walk around the roof terrace and the exhibition spaces of the Casa Milà, while listening to an audioguide. People also call it “La Pedrera“ (engl. quarry), because the residents of Barcelona were not very amused by the building with its curved façade and the many projections. Barbara and her boyfriend, however, are astonished at Gaudí’s innovative architecture and have to tear theirselves away, in order to not miss the admission for Gaudí’s most famous building: the Sagrada Familia, which he dedicated his life to. So, in a way, they follow the course of his productive years chronologically.

La Pedrera

With its curvy façade, “La Pedrera” captivates all of its visitors.

Barcelona’s landmark

From the outside, the two are not very impressed as the building is not finished yet and a great deal of construction cranes shape the usual image. Therefore, they don’t really get why this church is supposed to be so special and unique, besides the many cranes, towers and other elements observed from the outside. As they enter the church, their opinions suddenly change. Amazed by the modern construction and the big luminous interior, both agree that the Sagrada Família is something special, indeed. Not only because of its history (they started to build it already 130 years ago!!!), but also because of its unusual looks, making it not a typical church. And that’s probably the reason for its incomparable uniqueness.

Barcelona's landmark

Long queues and huge cranes are part of the usual picture of the Sagrada Familia.

Tow days, hundreds of impressions, one certainty

Still fascinated by the architecture of Gaudí, Barbara and her boyfriend have to pack their things, because their time in Barcelona is coming to an end. Arrived with few ideas and plans, they leave with much more impressions and memories. They’re sure, this won’t be their last trip to the vivid metropolis at the Mediterranean Sea. Barcelona put a spell on them and still has a lot more to offer…let’s see where they will end up next.

Last view over Barcelona

One last view over the Catalonian capital.

 

Three restaurant chefs

Disfrutar in Barcelona wins the ‘Miele One to Watch’ Award 2017

Restaurant run by former El Bulli chefs as global rising star

Disfrutar in Barcelona has been named this year’s Miele One To Watch by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. Opened in December 2014, Disfrutar is a collaboration between chefs Mateu Casañas, Oriol Castro and Eduard Xatruch. The three met while cooking at former No.1 restaurant El Bulli, where they worked alongside legendary Spanish chef Ferran Adrià.

Disfrutar as one of  the world’s 50 best restaurants

Disfrutar’s founders will be presented with the coveted award at The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards in Melbourne on April 5th. The Miele One To Watch Award celebrates emerging global talent and recognizes a restaurant that is outside the 50 Best itself but has the potential to rise up the list in the near future.

Front of Disfrutar restaurant

The modern front of the restaurant. (photo: Adri Goula)

“Worthy winners of the Miele One To Watch Award”

William Drew, Group Editor of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, said: “Disfrutar showcases the individual talents of these three chefs and broadens their influence on Spain’s culinary scene. Their commitment to pushing the creative boundaries of gastronomy makes them worthy winners of the Miele One To Watch Award.”

Inside the restaurant

From inside, the new restaurant has an understated elegance. (photo: Adri Goula)

Disfrutar – a symbolic nod to Barcelona’s cultural heritage

Following El Bulli’s 2011 closure, Casañas, Castro and Xatruch opened „Compartir“ (meaning “share”) in Cadaqués. Building on the success of their initial venture, the trio launched Disfrutar (meaning “to enjoy”) to widespread acclaim, earning their first Michelin star in 2016. Centrally located in Barcelona’s Eixample district, Disfrutar evokes a Mediterranean spirit with its décor and laid-back ambience. Beyond the entrance, guests walk past two open kitchens and are led into the spacious, whitewashed dining room that extends to an open terrace. Bright and earth-coloured ceramics in various forms dominate the space, a symbolic nod to Barcelona’s cultural heritage and the restaurant’s focus on artistry.

Disfrutar's kitchen design

With its earth-coloured ceramics and the open kitchen, Disfrutar evokes a Mediterranean spirit, indeed. (photo: Adri Goula)

Macaroni made out of gelatin

While Disfrutar’s multi-course tasting menus uphold modernist culinary principles, they also reveal the chefs’ quirky personalities. Avantgarde, theatrical and inventive, each course aims to delight and excite the senses. Signature dishes include macaroni made from gelatin, tossed in truffle foam and smothered in Parmesan at the table. A deconstructed whisky tart invites guests to wash their hands in whisky and inhale the scent as they eat.

One of Gaudís houses at Passeig de Graçia.

48 hours Barcelona

Barcelona is one of those cities, where you rather stay than leave. It‘s not a surprise, that  again and again travelers strand in this bustling metropolis – you‘ll hardly find another European city, sticking its toes into the warm Mediterranean Sea while at the same time carrying a cultural crown on the head. The authentic, stunning architecture of the Gothic Quarter, the vibrant, trendy subculture, the traces of Picasso and Gaudí, making the heart of any art fan beat faster – Barcelona is a seductress, mastering her trade with perfection. So how about 48 hours date to get a little foretaste? If you don‘t believe in love at first sight, you probably going to be convinced of the opposite.

View of the city.

Day 1 – flaneurs and night owls

A classic date usually starts with a coffee and a first glance – in this case, it‘s the view of the ocean panorama, unfolding behind the rolling seafront of the city. There‘s no better place to have breakfast and do some people watching. Side by side hide the Cafés in the shade of the palm trees, tourists from the nearby hotels mingle with tanned locals, longboarders and fitness junkies. You feel yourself drawn into Barcelona‘s pulsating atmosphere immediately- it seems to be an endless summer.

After this first impression, it‘s time for a little stroll along the promenade. Barcelona‘s famous harbour is only a stone‘s throw away and the view is fantastic. At least as impressive as the yachts and sailboats is the facade of the Maremagnum Shopping Mall, where you find yourself reflected in front of the ocean. As tempting as it might be, the shopping will have to wait – you normally don‘t get a diamond ring at the first date.

The facade of the Maremagnum shopping centre.

Afterwards, it gets a bit more turbulent- on Barcelona’s most famous road section La Rambla. You may hate it or love it – but you can‘t leave the city without risking a look. Surrounded by restaurants and souvenir shops, it marks the border between the district Raval and the Gothic Quarter. It‘s like a colorful open-air-circus with all the wandering travelers, mime artists and caricaturists. If you fed up by the hustle and bustle, you can loose yourself in the narrow streets of the Barrio Gothic or the Raval.

After this tour, it’s time for a lunch break – you should never be hungry on a date. Right at the end of the Rambla, you stumble upon a huge hall, where the voices of the traders and the smell of fresh food is already seeping through the gates.La Boqueria, Barcelonas market hall, dates back to the 11th century and leaves the after-taste of culinary diversity and the Spanish culture. Gossiping and haggeling residents push through the stalls. The huge selection of fruits, vegetables, meat and fish makes the decision hard – it‘s best to take a little of everything and sit down on the shady square behind the hall to enjoy a delicious picnic.

Good vibes in Barcelonas streets.

By now, the ice should be broken and romance is requiered. Located just outside the town on a hill, the Parc Güell not only attracts with the wonderful view over the city. Antonio Gaudí created it 1900 – 1914 on behalf of the industrialist Eusebi Güell, who envisioned a English garden with 60 different villas. After completing the third house, the financial resources were used up – perhaps to the benefit of the park. Surrounded by Mediterranean vegetation are Gaudí’s dazzling artworks scattered along the path . You can gaze at the skyline from the platform. It‘s the perfect place to chill out for a bit.

After the descent of the hill, it‘s already time for a first (or maybe also a second or a third) cocktail in one of the many bars on the way back into the city. As you know, the way to the heart is through the stomach, and it‘s time for a dinner, giving the first day the icing of the cake. You can eat everywhere in Barcelona – but the awards of the Michelin Guides are the most trusted. For those looking for a fancy spot, the hotel restaurants Enoteca, Àbac and Moments offer delicious meals. A bit more casual, but still full of atmosphere is the restaurant Lasarte. Bargain hunters are going to be happy in on of the countless cheap tapas bars in Raval.

Musicians in one of the streets of Raval.

The first encounter with Barcelona could now come to an end, but it‘s more likely that you already crave for more – and the city becomes even more alive just after dark. The clubs and discos now open their gates for night owls and crazy dancers. No matter what day it is, there‘s always something to celebrate. Everyone‘s tastes are diffrent and there‘s plenty to chose from. Chaotic nights at Razzmatrazz with more fun and less memories, dancing with the mixed crowd at the legendary Apolo Club or swinging your hips to Hip Hop grooves  at Otto Zutz. As the name suggests, suit- and highheelswearers can be found at Bling Bling and Shôko. No matter where you end up, there‘s always enough time for a nightcap at the beach. The first night together is ticked off.

Day Two – hangover and storybook romance

It is likely, that the second day after a long night does not begin quite as lively as the first one.  Nevertheless, to get on your feet, catch a metro to Passein de Graçia – a huge All-you-can-eat hangover buffet with cold and warm food awaits you at La Vaca Paca. Don‘t worry, you can leave your sunglasses on, that makes it easier to watch the passing crowd. Barcelona is not only a world- but also a shopping metropolis and Passeig de Graçia is the right place to fill up your bags. The warm up phase is finished now and the city will ensure, that you don‘t return with empty hands. If you‘re tired of strolling, you can gaze at Gaudís colorful houses just a few meters up the street.

One of Gaudís houses at Passeig de Graçia.

If you long for a bit more peace and atmosphere after this shopping marathon, it‘s now time for a journey through the subcultural heart of the city. The Raval has long been considered as a ambiguous neighborhood, populated by prostitution and crime – now its about to become the new scene-district of Barcelona.Cultural diversity is the key word and everything from kebab shops to authentic Asians can be found. Charming cafés and cozy bars have joined this colorful mixture and the Hipsters and Bohemians of the city empty the first pitchers of Sangria on the terraces. Get lost in the tiny, narrow alleys and watch out for the great tapas bars, hiding in the shadows of the houses.

No matter, whether you feel hangoverish or not, there‘s one more sight to be discovered. La Sagrada Familia may not be a beauty, but it‘s a sign of the variety and versatility of the city. Yes, exactly – its yonder monumental church, always hiding behind scaffolding. In 1882, the architect Francisco de Paula started the project, a year later Gaudí took over the ongoing construction. To this day, countless hands have left their traces in the architecture of the church, recognizable by its unusual appearance.

Street artist in the city.

After this second, eventful day parting moods will come up. It‘s probably unnecessary, but Barcelona has one last ace up his sleeve to finally wrap you around the finger. Even from a distance shine the lights of Montjuïc Mountain into the darkness – you simply have to follow them until you come to the grand palace, where the fountain of Montjuïc spews the water high into the air.  When the darkness has fallen over the park, you can witness a stunning spectacle consisting of countless, colorful lights and huge columns of water. Just grab a bottle of wine and a picnic basket and enjoy the view of the sparkling city. A farewell forever is thus impossible.

A sailing boat at the Port of Barcelona.

¡Viva Barcelona!

Most of us associate with a trip to the capital of Catalonia a fulltime schedule of activities: Starting with the picturesque Parque Güell, then visiting the Sagrada Familia as the most popular church of the city, ending up in the FC Barcelona Football Museum – this city really seems to offer many activities and sights for everyone. So we made our way into the city, but honestly, our daily schedule seemed a bit different on this sunny morning. Just a few metro stops away from the central station, we directly became one with the tumult of a constantly pulsating metropolis.

We were totally magnetised, looking forward to crowded streets, priceless drink prices, wildly gesticulating people and disoriented tourists.

barcelona-trip-plaza-fassade

Right in the middle, instead of just taking – this was probably the motto of our current trip. At 10 am, which is more or less an atypical time for people that are totally focussed on their upcoming holidays, the motto was just rarely realizable.

A Café Sólo should wake up our dizzy minds this morning – priceless, but totally necesarry. There we were, badly trying to avoid the typical tourism manner, willig to experience the unconditional and uncensored flow of the city.

barcelona-trip-fenster-august-2014

Afterwards, this was admittetly a bit naive – at least a map would have saved a detour at one or the other point – but who cares, we were here, in a good mood, hungry for new impressions and a new metropolis. Tourist, or not – our cameras round our necks as well as our tan, which still reminded of German summer, definitely revealed our origin – the Plaça Catalunya should become our first destination.

barcelona-august-2014-trip-calle

A place full of people with all itstour Buses in rank and file was framed by countless Spanish chain stores. Our noses just seemed to stick to the shop windows of Zara and Mango, closely followed by our faszination for Gucci, Cartier and Chanel – here, a hand bag costs as much as a fulltime study credit…
After this short shopping madness and a “if we only have so much money“, the small alleys and mysterious places gathered our total attention.

barcelona-trip-gotisches-viertel

barcelona-gaudi-haus-trip

After a good lunch in the afternoon – seafood and aioli included – we paved our way through the Gothic District of the city. Narrow lanes, bordered by lofty facades with 2 sqm balconies, small shops full of antiques and trinkets recorded a picturesque image of the “Old Barcelona”.

barcelona-trip-food

barcelona-trip-fruits

Here it was – our personal impression of the city, far away from the crowded attractions with their long queues in the summer time, we were allowed to experience Barcelona in our individual way.
An ice cream in one hand and a leather strap to the other, accompanied by many new impressions, we started our way home.

barcelona-overview-street-trip

 

 

A man waiting in front of his shop in Raval.

Eight hours walk trough Barcelonas Raval…

Mission: One day and one night in Barcelona, 8 hours of time, sniffing out one district until I know every hidden spot.It‘s ten in the morning, I‘m sitting in a small bar, a cup of coffee and a sandwich in front of me, trying to swallow the hangover from last night – I just couldn‘t resist the alluring nightlife of Barcelona. It was worth it and I cannot waste my day – I‘ve got nine hours left before I‘m going to catch my train back home and my curiosity screams louder than my buzzing head. Also, I feel quite twitchy, because the city once again trapped me and even tough I really love the quietness of the little villages, I sometimes need this bustling atmosphere – I‘m normally living in the middle of Berlin.

Some of the houses are very close to each other.

What am I going to do, with this little time and in a city, which seems to birm with liveliness? The benefit is, that I already know, where I want to spend my day. I‘m not a big sightseeing fan, I‘m anyway to small to catch a glimpse on a building between all the tourists. It‘s the district Raval, located south of the Rambla and looking like the shape of a fist on the map, which is attracting me. A few years ago, rarely any visitor would have come here and Raval appeared to be the contrary of the  dazzling tourist promenades of Barcelona. Prostitution and crime were on daily occurrence, the general conditions of living were disastrous and the educational level was low. It was not till the city started to improve these conditions after the death of Franco, that Ravals dark face became a little more friendly. Bit by bit, a vividly subculture of young people developed and charming, little cafés and bars found their way into the district. Even if there‘s still a rough wind blowing trough some of the streets, Raval is now presented as one of Barcelonas most scenic quarters.

A few years ago, Raval was famous for prostitution and crime.

But that‘s not the main reason, why I‘m so curious about exploring it – I‘m normally living in Berlin Neukölln, which could be the identical twin of Raval. Therefore, I‘m also seeking for a little feeling of home in the outland – which would make it impossible for me, not to return to Barcelona for a longer time.
One hour later, after I managed to escape the crowd walking up and down the Rambla, I finally find myself in the chaotic tangle of narrow streets, which demand full concentration of my groggy head.
It‘s astounding, how quite the place all of a sudden becomes – I feel like slipping into a cocoon and the rest of the world is unable to follow me. But it‘s not only the silence, which is diffrent. Little by little, greengrocerys and cornerstores replace the shops, where the tourists are usually buying their souvenirs.

There are rarely any tourist in Raval.

I neither have a travel guide nor a citymap, that‘s why I decide to wander around aimlessly.    The streets soon become more and more narrow, some of the houses are built so close, that their balconys almost touch each other. Colorful shirts and dresses flutter on clotheslines above my head. The alley in front of me is now almost deserted, I can hear kids screaming and the noise of a hoover. On the contrary of the crowded Rambla, Raval seems to be more honest and I can find marks of the everydaylife of it‘s inhabitants almost on every corner. As I‘m used to it from where I live in Berlin, I soon notice, that there are diffrent areas in this district. The deeper I get into it, the more I betake myself into the cultural melting pot.
The silence merges into a noisy soundscape – I walk into alleys, in which market stalls and greengrocherys line both sides of the path. Women, wearing headscarfs, fill up their shopping bags and tattle with each other, children are playing at the roadside. When the first kebab shop appears, it finally reminds me of home.

The kebab shop reminded me of my home.

A few streets further down, the first graffitis appear – the evidence, that I slowly walk towards the subcultural heart of the Raval. Cafés and bars are scattered all over the place, the terraces are full of young people, wearing sunglasses and drinking carafes of sangria, the smell of incense sticks and creativity seeps out of the shop – doors.The apartments are mostly populated by students, flags and posters stick to the grey walls.
Altought the atmosphere of Raval is very colorful and seems to birm over with agility, it‘s impossible to walk trough this district without catching a glimpse into it‘s ugly face. I cross areas, in which the silence gives way to a ambience of depression – the air is so stifling hot and sticky, that I don‘t even want to breath it, piles of rubbish line the road like termite hills. The plastering comes of the walls, windows are broken or not even existent. The gazes of the few people I meet, are distrustful and grumbly – I put my camera and my note book into my backpack, otherwise I would feel like a sensation – seeker, looking for the most touching evidence of incapacity.

Raval is very rich in contrasts.

This seems to be the place, where the older inhabitants of the Raval went. Or better said: they where banished, from where they were living before, when more and more students moved into the cheap flats and the rental prices started to rise. That‘s the other side of the picture: subculture and scenic spot on the one hand, gentrifictation and uprooting on the other.
After eight hours, I finally break out of the cocoon – the chaotic chrush on the Rambla seems even more artificially to me. I don‘t want to draw a conclusion after this day – the Raval is anyway to multilayered and rich in contrast to describe it with only a few words. But I‘m clear in my mind about one matter: Barcelona has stolen a little piece of my heart and I have to fetch it back.

On of the highlights of the event: el Correfoc

Fiestas La Mercé Barcelona

Espectacular culture event in Barcelona

These are the most important fiestas in the city of Barcelona, celebrated around 24 September. These fiestas were first held in 1871, in honour of the Virgen de la Merced, named patron saint of the city by Pope Pious IX in 1868. The programme for the fiesta centres especially on Mediterranean culture, and includes more than 500 activities to suit all tastes: from street entertainment and concerts to folk dances, theatre performances and dance shows in the street. There are a host of things to see. Special mention should be made of the traditional human castles, parades of “giants and big-heads”, the Correfoc (characters in costume carrying flaming torches and flares), as well as the BAM independent music Festival.

22.-25.09.2011

Every year. The International Motor Show in Barcelona

International Motor Show – Barcelona

Barcelona International Motor Show

The Barcelona International Motor Show will celebrate its 36th edition at the Montjuïc exhibition centre with two clear stars of the show: the electric car and the presentation of innovations from more than 30 manufacturers as the main way to attract visitors and pro mote the revival of the sector.The fact that the Spanish Formula 1 Grand Prix is taking place at the Circuit de Catalunya in Montmeló during the same week as the Barcelona International Motor Show will make the city the unarguable motor capital of the world for one week.

Logo Salon Internacional Automovil

http://www.salonautomovil.com/